Herbs…A living Organic Edible “Monet”

A TREAT FOR THE SENSES

Whether in a simple pot on window sills, in the balcony or terrace in a raised bed or in your herbaceous border – most herbs can be grown naturally at your doorstep without much effort. Besides a delicious fragrance, when combined with herbaceous plants you end up with a living organic and edible “Monet”.

 Herbs offer an intense and aromatic pallet for everyday cooking or for a refreshing ice tea, reason enough to enter into the universe of Herbs..

One thing is clear: If you grow your own herbs, true freshness is guaranteed…No supply chain is shorter than that from your garden to your kitchen to you table!

 Furthermore your personal herb corner also provides certainty about how the food is grown. Self-grown plants give complete transparency, which ends up on the plate.

SUSTAINABLE, ORGANIC AND   DELICIOUS COMBINATIONS

WHAT HOW AND WHEN?

For healthy herb growth, it is important to take into account which Herbs belong together, different combinations, whether on the ground or in a pot, and how to combine.

Here are some suggestions:

Combination 1

Southern-Mediterranean, Ideal for every day they all like the sun.

Basil, Tarragon, Thyme, Rosemary, Sage and savory

Lavender, Sage and most Mediterranean herbs; like well drained and poor soil as well as warmth. A combination of gravel and compost make an ideal medium.

Combination 2

Peppermint, Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis), parsley and Nettles

Unlike to basil and friends this group can be planted in a partially shaded site, rich and humid soil is an advantage, during the growth it can be fertilized with stinging nettle manure, or compost.

PLANTED ONCE…HARVESTED FOR A LONG TIME

LOCATION IS EVERYTHING!

These two combinations are only a window to many more herbs and combinations, of course you can always experiment and see what work best for you. It is always good to have a starting point, and some basic knowledge to achieve better results.

Some species develop essential nutrients when grown in combination with nettles, this results in a much more fragrant herb, for example: Peppermint, Dill, Fennel, Chervil and parsley.

Oregano, Mint and Thyme when grown with vegetables and shrubs help keep snails away!

Spices and Herbs work well as a gap filler in vegetable beds, but some rules must be observed for not all combinations work. There are tables to be found on the internet. Thyme, Oregano, Parsley and Dill should be moved around every year. It is good practice to relocate herbs every 3 to 4 years.

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